‘Digital Death Discussion’ with Stacey Pitsillides

Our fifth week GAMSWEN lecture was a topic of controversy and related to every one in the lecture theatre. Lecturer, Stacey Pitsillides spoke about ‘Digital Death’. She highlighted the common use of internet activity and how we share and record data. Due to the rise of social media we discussed whether the data we share still belongs to us, or is just a another addition to a world wide database.

Stacey started the lecture with a clip from her final project of BA Design called ‘Rest In Pixels’. Stacey noticed her research is based on philosophical debates and findings. Students are required to produce social research for a majority of their projects they start, and this topic was an influential insight to research in practice.  During our time on the course we form descriptions of our identity and how we connect this information together. This technique is something I believe everyone should experiment with, because through research you explore different sources of origin, even your own origin. (scientifically, historically, culturally) 

Egg or Chicken?

During this lecture, every image was a great example to describe Digital Death. Stacey defined this ‘as the death of a living being and the way it affects the digital world or the death of a digital object and the way it affects a living being’. An image of an Egyptian mummy in the British museum highlights the fact that this item is a dead body which is kept under security in a public establishment. We has the public walk past it, discuss its purpose and origin however we don’t recognise that this is the remains of an human being.

Stacey showed us that now this human is now seen as a common object. We would share different emotion if around a recently deceased person then too someone now identified by a majority as a mummy.

 

 

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